The Rose Rent PDF/EPUB â The Rose Epub /


The Rose Rent A late spring inbrings dismay to the Abbey of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, for there may be no roses by June nd On that day the young widow Perle must receive one white rose as rent for the house she has given to benefit the abbey or the contract is void When nature finally complies, a pious monk is sent to pay the rent and is found murdered beside the hacked rose bush The abbey s wise herbalist, Brother Cadfael, follows the trail of bloodied petals He knows the lovely widow s dowry is far greater with her house included, and she will likely wed again But before Cadfael can ponder if a greedy suitor has done this dreadful deed, another crime is committed Now the good monk must thread his way through a tangle tortuous than the widow s thorny bushes or there will be tears


10 thoughts on “The Rose Rent

  1. HBalikov HBalikov says:

    Madam, there is here matter that must distress you, that we cannot deny I will not hide anything from you This house is your gift, and truth is your due But you must not take to yourselfthan is customary from any godly gentlewoman in compassion for a young life taken untimely No part of this stems from you, and no part of what must be done about it falls to your duty Judith Perle has suffered a great loss She watched the death of her husband from disease and then lost their child Madam, there is here matter that must distress you, that we cannot deny I will not hide anything from you This house is your gift, and truth is your due But you must not take to yourselfthan is customary from any godly gentlewoman in compassion for a young life taken untimely No part of this stems from you, and no part of what must be done about it falls to your duty Judith Perle has suffered a great loss She watched the death of her husband from disease and then lost their child to miscarriage several weeks later Her family of clothiers was the most successful in Shrewsbury In her grief and wish to give up some of her worldly things she gave to the Abbey of St Peter and Paul one of her properties that was in the town The payment for it was the rose rent of the title One perfect rose from the magnificent large bush that grew in that building s garden Then comes a murder that affects the Abbey and her in ways never anticipated This is one of the most poignant stories in the Cadfael series It isn t that Peters makes Judith pitiable She is a strong woman who has the intellect to consider issues both large and small She also is willing to look at herself, her life and her purpose in ways that most wouldn t And all of this is again probed by the ever curious Cadfael whose compassion and insights are so interesting to follow Judith Perle stood embattled and alone, captive to greed and brutality Even her good works conspired against her, even her generosity turned venomous, to poison her life Having said all of that, I again want to praise Peters for her research and ability to inform us of what life was really like at that period of time, in a turbulent England That is what makes this series so unique and has me hooked Peters can weave a mystery but what she does best is to give us as full a picture as possible of context of that mystery The characters are nuanced and they often have deep psychological or pathological elements Here she explores the relationship between the town and the abbey as well as between classes of townspeople and those who live outside in the country Each time that I re read one of these stories, I find that I take it at a slower pace, savoring what she is offering.This book is one of her very fine efforts yet I feel the need to supply some examples so you know what to expect Descriptions of work and trade As heiress to the clothier s business for want of a brother, she had learned all the skills involved, from teasing and carding to the loom and the final cutting of garments, though she found herself much out of practice now at the distaff The sheaf of carded wool before her was russet red Even the dye stuffs came seasonally, and last summer s crop of woad for the blues was generally used up by April or May, to be followed by these variations on reds and browns and yellows, which Godfrey Fuller produced from the lichens and madders He knew his craft The lengths of cloth he would finally get back for fulling had a clear, fast colour, and fetched good prices There was room enough in all that elongated building, besides the living rooms of the family, to house ample stores in a good dry undercroft, and provide space for all the girls who carded and combed the newly dyed wool, besides three horizontal looms set up in their own outbuilding, and plenty of room in the long hall for half a dozen spinsters at once Others worked in their own homes, and so did five other weavers about the town The Vestiers were the biggest and best known clothiers in Shrewsbury Only the dyeing of the fleeces and fulling of the cloth were put out into the experienced hands of Godfrey Fuller, who had his dye house and fulling works and tenterground just down river, under the wall of the castle At this time of year the first fleeces of the clip had already been purchased and sorted, and sent to be dyed, and on this same day had been duly delivered in person by Godfrey Niall did a good trade in everything from brooches and buttons, small weights and pins, to metal cooking pots, ewers and dishes, and paid the abbey a suitable rent for his premises He had even worked occasionally with others of his trade in the founding of bells, but that was a very rare commission, and demanded travel to the site itself, rather than having to transport the heavy bells after casting The smith was working in a corner of his shop, on the rim of a dish beaten out in sheet metal, pecking away with punch and mallet at an incised decoration of leaves Family life and retreat from it Cecily s two boys and a girl ranged from ten years old down to six, and Niall s own chick was the youngest and the pet Now all four were curled up like a litter of puppies on their hay mattresses in the little loft, fast asleep, and round the trestle table in the hall the elders could talk freely without disturbing them But if ever you need a place to hide, for a little while or a long while, come to Godric s Ford and bring all your frets in with you, and you shall find a refuge for as long as you need, with no vows taken, never unless you come to it with a whole heart And I will keep the door against the world until you see fit to go forth again Nature As so often happened in a late season, the summer had all but caught up with the laggard spring, flowers which had lingered shivering and reluctant to bloom suddenly sprang into fevered haste, bursting their buds overnight into a blazing prime The crops, slower to take risks, might still be as much as a month late, but they would be lavish and clean, half their hereditary enemies chilled to death in April and May Understanding of what the church offered and required For if Eluric was not a suicide, but had gone to his end faithfully bearing his burden and seeking to prevent an evil act, then his resting place in the cemetery was assured, and his passage through death, however his account might stand for little sins needing purging, as safe as a prodigal son re entering his father s house His year s novitiate was almost over, and soon he would be admitted as a full brother No power or persuasion could have induced him to depart from the service of the saint who had healed him What to Cadfael was still the serious burden and stumbling block of obedience, Rhun embraced as a privilege, as happily as he accepted the sunlight on his face


  2. Girl with her Head in a Book Girl with her Head in a Book says:

    For my full review book fulfills the published in the year you were born obligation for my 2015 Reading Challenge but really, I was long overdue for another Brother Cadfael mystery I have mentioned before that I am easily scared and gore really does not interest me in the slightest Increasingly, modern crime fiction seems to concentrate on progressively baroque incidents that really put the offensive into criminal offense, all of it solved usin For my full review book fulfills the published in the year you were born obligation for my 2015 Reading Challenge but really, I was long overdue for another Brother Cadfael mystery I have mentioned before that I am easily scared and gore really does not interest me in the slightest Increasingly, modern crime fiction seems to concentrate on progressively baroque incidents that really put the offensive into criminal offense, all of it solved using high powered technology and borderline supernatural forensic techniques I am thinking here in particular of Criminal Minds, which my family enjoyed for the first two series but then the rising levels of sexual depravity put us off We were not alone one of the show s chief leads left it for the same reason It s interesting to me therefore that people such as my own dear Dad are turning towards vintage crime Sophie Hannah wrote an Agatha Christie inspired Poirot story More andpieces of crime fiction are being set in the 1940s or even earlier If you like The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie, or The Railway Detective remember, Ellis Peters was doing that whole vintage thing several decades ago Cadfael is crime fiction for people who don t like crime.rose rentThis is Cadfael s thirteenth outing but given that I tend to read them in no particular order, I am not sure how far into the series I really am Oddly though, this was the only story which I remember being adapted for television I watched it aged roughly nine and tried to read it the book but gave up after only a few pages Still, the mists of time had made the ending slightly fuzzy so I didn t feel like I was missing anything The plot revolves around wealthy widow Judith Perle still only twenty five, she is mourning her husband who passed away four years previously, the grief of which caused her to miscarry a much wanted baby Mistress Perle has chosen to make a gift of the house she once shared with her husband to the abbey, requesting only one white rose a year as rent However, with the deadline for the rent approaching, it appears that someone is very keen for the contract to be defaulted upon, with first the rose bush being attacked and then Mistress Perle herself going missing.Ellis Peters is a very gentle writer, the very sentences of her prose feel dainty Each book introduces where we are with the Stephen Matilda conflict before zooming in to the action in Shrewsbury Although it may stretch credulity slightly that all these crimes could occur in such a relatively small town and that the person best placed to investigate should be a monk who has sworn to a life in the cloister, but somehow it works Cadfael, as regular readers of the series are aware, is no ordinary monk He fought in the Crusades, knew the love of several good women, lived in the world and travelled it and finally, when he heard the call, he settled down to a life tending a herb garden He is no innocent, he knows his stuff and he should never have been played onscreen by David Jacobi Here he is called upon for life advice by the mournful Judith Perle, garden tips by people interested in the rose bush and then also a bit of the standard crime scene investigation with a sideline in footprint analysis.ellis petersThe lovely thing about coming to a series as long as The Brother Cadfael Mysteries is that for the returning reader, there are so many recurring characters and in jokes The Rose Rent takes place around the festival marking the translation of St Winifred, patron saint of the Abbey Hugh Berringar, local sheriff and Cadfael s closest friend, slyly notes that not all is as it seems about that particular figure Sister Magdalena makes a welcome reappearance, having become something of a deus ex machina in her ability to assist Cadfael in sorting out issues of a delicate nature to do with ladies problems Sister Magdalena having made her first appearance as the mistress of a murder victim who chose the cloister because she was done with living in sin but wanted something with career progression opportunities Ellis Peters may look sweet and prim in the photos, but she has such grace for her characters there are few sins which she is unwilling to forgive and even the most culpable characters are generally explained as having been weak or foolish or having got themselves into situations which overwhelmed them Nobody is ever wholly evil.There is a particular unhappiness at the core of The Rose Rent however, with a strong woman being got at by all sides because her unmarried state makes her an anomaly in a world governed by strict rules Judith Perle is beholden to no man, she has neither husband nor father to order her but nobody is willing to let her be Peters contrasts her life as yet unfulfilled with that of Sister Magdalena who flourishes as a nun and thus hopes to expatiate her sin On the other hand there is Niall the bronzemith, widower with a child who he has not the time to care for but who longs for a life with a greater softness It may seem obvious that these two characters paths will converge but it makes it no less lovely when they do The Rose Rent is one of those editions of the series where Cadfael himself takes something of a back seat, stepping in only at crucial moments and holding his tongue when he thinks it wise For all that Cadfael may play by the social s of medieval Britain, written by someone with borderline Victorian sensibilities, it is a pure comfort read While An Excellent Mystery was a hymn to love in all its forms, I think that The Rose Rent wasabout finding a way back to contentment, discovering a way and a place of being There are few authors who write with such a holistic sense of kindness as Peters and as always, I finished The Rose Rent thinking that the world was a nicer place than I did before I started it


  3. Barb in Maryland Barb in Maryland says:

    An almost melancholy book one of the quietest of the series thus far.Young Judith Perle is still grieving for her husband, who died way too young and for the child she miscarried shortly after his death Unable to bear living in the house where she had been so happy, she signed it over to the Abbey for the nominal yearly rent of one rose from the house s garden.Judith is still rich, as she was the heir of her late father, an important clothier in Shrewsbury She oversees the business from the c An almost melancholy book one of the quietest of the series thus far.Young Judith Perle is still grieving for her husband, who died way too young and for the child she miscarried shortly after his death Unable to bear living in the house where she had been so happy, she signed it over to the Abbey for the nominal yearly rent of one rose from the house s garden.Judith is still rich, as she was the heir of her late father, an important clothier in Shrewsbury She oversees the business from the carding of the wool to the weaving of the cloth Judith has no lack of young men in her life her cousin Miles, who helps run the business young Bertred, who is foreman of her weavers Vivian Hynde, young man about town with a fondness for high living each of whom would love to marry her Each of whom would love for the rose rent to not be paid and the house return to Judith s ownership But would any of them stoop to sabotaging the rose bush, would any of them stoop to committing murder For murder has been done young Brother Eluric is found dead in the garden, next to the rose bush He had delivered the rose rent for several years, but why is he in the garden days before the rent is due and who would kill such an innocent young man Then Judith vanishesLovely little mystery with a very satisfactory conclusion The real treat for me was Peters giving us a good look at one of the town s businesses She had done it in prior books, one featuring a master carpenter, another featuring a goldsmith this time the wool trade cloth making take a turn in the spotlight Over the course of the series the reader gets a good look at how Shrewsbury functioned as a town There sto history than just battles and politics the day to day life of ordinary people is also important


  4. Karin Karin says:

    A house is bequeathed to the monastery in exchange for one rose to be delivered to the owner annually The young monk given this job is found dead, days before the rent is due, and the owner of the house, a wealthy young widow being wooed by many men as much for her business as anything else, has vanished This is one of the better books in this series all are fairly good that I ve read so far this being the last one I ve read at this writing This is one of those rare series that seems to k A house is bequeathed to the monastery in exchange for one rose to be delivered to the owner annually The young monk given this job is found dead, days before the rent is due, and the owner of the house, a wealthy young widow being wooed by many men as much for her business as anything else, has vanished This is one of the better books in this series all are fairly good that I ve read so far this being the last one I ve read at this writing This is one of those rare series that seems to keep a steady level of writing throughout and not wane out of good ideas and writing level


  5. Kathryn Kathryn says:

    1st Recorded Reading February 11, 2005One would think that Abbot Radulfus of the Abbey would have long since confined Brother Cadfael to his herbarium to keep him out of trouble or,accurately, to keep dead bodies from multiplying with alarming frequency One wonders if anyone has written a parody of Brother Cadfael, in which he is insane craftily so and is actually the murderer of all the dead bodies that pop up near the Abbey Having said all that, this Fourteenth Chronicle is good, a 1st Recorded Reading February 11, 2005One would think that Abbot Radulfus of the Abbey would have long since confined Brother Cadfael to his herbarium to keep him out of trouble or,accurately, to keep dead bodies from multiplying with alarming frequency One wonders if anyone has written a parody of Brother Cadfael, in which he is insane craftily so and is actually the murderer of all the dead bodies that pop up near the Abbey Having said all that, this Fourteenth Chronicle is good, and liberally supplied with red herrings to confuse the unwary reader.Spring is late to arrive in Shrewsbury in 1142 in fact, the spring thaw does not occur until the first of June This is a good thing not least that the crops can now be sown , because the Rose Rent is due to the widowed Judith Pearle on the day of the Translation of St Winifred, June 22 When Judith was widowed, some four or five years ago, followed by the miscarriage of her only child, she gave her house in the Foregate where she and her husband had lived to the Abbey, with the only proviso being that she is to receive one white rose from the rosebush at the house on St Winifred s Day She lives in Shrewsbury proper now, running her weaving business with the help of her cousin Miles Coliar and his mother her aunt Niall the bronzesmith lives in the property in the Foregate that was given to the Abbey he is widowed, and his five year old daughter lives with his sister out in Pulley some five miles distant.A young monk, who has been resident in the Abbey since his early youth, has been the designated person to take the rose from the bush to the young Widow Pearle each year but Brother Eluric asks that he be relieved from the duty this year, as he has fallen in love with the widow, and is tormented by his desire for her He is relived of the duty but soon afterward, he is found dead under the rose bush in question, with the rosebush hacked but not destroyed.It is true that there are those who would like to marry the Widow Pearle, who is in her mid twenties, most notably Vivian Hynde whose father owns the largest flock of sheep in the Shire and Godfrey Fuller, another local merchant in the town The Abbey and Brother Cadfael must determine who killed their monk, and why, and what it has to do with the annual Rose Rent due to Judith Pearle.I enjoyed reading this book while I was fairly sure WhoDunIt by the middle of the book, the Red Herrings distracted me as they are meant to do


  6. Amalie Amalie says:

    This is the thirteenth book in the Brother Cadfael series As such, it is much like the others in a general way That is, the mystery isn t difficult to see through, so you ll probably have figured out whodunit before the solution is entirely revealed On the other hand, the historical events are precise, the author makes a single historical detail the basis for a wonderfully imaginative tale in which the rich fabric of medieval life is beautifully unfolded Then as always the prose is elegant This is the thirteenth book in the Brother Cadfael series As such, it is much like the others in a general way That is, the mystery isn t difficult to see through, so you ll probably have figured out whodunit before the solution is entirely revealed On the other hand, the historical events are precise, the author makes a single historical detail the basis for a wonderfully imaginative tale in which the rich fabric of medieval life is beautifully unfolded Then as always the prose is elegant, and the characterization is outstanding I plan on reading the rest, so it s safe to conclude I m enjoying them I recommend this one I also recommend reading themor less in order from the beginning, as later books sometimes refer to earlier ones


  7. Deborah Ideiosepius Deborah Ideiosepius says:

    The chronicles of the mediaeval whodunnit continue that description, apt as it is, always makes me chuckle Brother Cadfael, a Welshman who after a long, adventurous and varied life decided to renounce the world and become a brother in the Shrewsbury Abbey is faced with a new murder mystery.A young widow, Judith Perle, has bestowed her valuable property on the Abbey, the only rent required is a single white rose from a bush in her former home, to be given into her own hand on a specific day The chronicles of the mediaeval whodunnit continue that description, apt as it is, always makes me chuckle Brother Cadfael, a Welshman who after a long, adventurous and varied life decided to renounce the world and become a brother in the Shrewsbury Abbey is faced with a new murder mystery.A young widow, Judith Perle, has bestowed her valuable property on the Abbey, the only rent required is a single white rose from a bush in her former home, to be given into her own hand on a specific day For a couple of years all went well, the widow has returned to her family home to command the valuable family weaving business, the roses are delivered to her hand and life goes on.This year however, strange a fatal events seem to be surrounding the widow and her legacy The rose bush is burnt by a mysterious invader, a brother is left dead, then the widow herself vanishes, leavingdead bodies in her wake..Brother Cadfael investigates in his quite unobtrusive way, the the course of which, we the readers get a lovely detailed picture into the Abbey and town of Shrewsbury in 1142 and beautifully drawn pictures of the people and their lives.I am very fond of this series of gently intriguing mysteries set in the twelfth century The historic element is the main draw card for me, but the writing is beautiful, rarely repetitious which is unusual in a long running series and the murder mysteries themselves are always intriguing with a very strong human element These mysteries are not about flash and thriller details, they are about people, there interests and small doings


  8. cloudyskye cloudyskye says:

    Another rather enjoyable trip to mediaeval Shrewsbury It s rather low key, two not so spectacular murders around a widowed rich young lady There are no personal developments for Cadfael or our other friends, so I m not surprised I had quite forgotten this one.


  9. Laura Laura says:

    A beautiful, wealthy widow turns her back on the world to find solace with the church and gives her house over to the abbey for the rent of a single white rose each year.


  10. Ron Ron says:

    What does it prove It proves that I am a fool, said Cadfael ruefully, though I have sometimes suspected as much myself One of the better chronicles of Cadfael A convoluted who dun it with excursions into the meaning of justice, vocation and love For a refreshing change, the potential lovers are not starry eyed youths And several may have mercenary motives In happiness or unhappiness, living is a duty, and must be done thoroughly Medieval life was hard, doubly so for a widow And a ric What does it prove It proves that I am a fool, said Cadfael ruefully, though I have sometimes suspected as much myself One of the better chronicles of Cadfael A convoluted who dun it with excursions into the meaning of justice, vocation and love For a refreshing change, the potential lovers are not starry eyed youths And several may have mercenary motives In happiness or unhappiness, living is a duty, and must be done thoroughly Medieval life was hard, doubly so for a widow And a rich widow had her own threats, some of them murderous It would be a most welcome refuge, to have a vocation elsewhere Which you have not, or you could not say that Pargeter explores the motives and consequences of those who seek to drop out of life In the process she examines not only medieval but modern alternatives.PBS Mystery did a decent job of their video of this story Grace is not a river into which a man can dip a pail at will, but a fountain that plays when it lists, and when it lists is dry and still Cadfael series excellent historical fiction Ellis Peters draws the reader into the twelfth century with modern story telling but holds us there with a richness of detail which evokes a time and place which might as well be mythic Though the foreground of each chronicle is a murder mystery, behind it a nation and a culture are woven in a wondrous tapestry


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